If you ask 10 people what the best house paint for exteriors is, you may get 10 different answers.

Everyone has their own experience and preference for their go-to paint brand.

So we turned to the painting contractors who have their boots on the ground (and brushes on the wall) to find out the best house paint for siding and stucco.

In this article, we’ll review:

  • The Best Exterior Paint for Stucco Siding

    • Why Does Stucco Require Different Paint?
    • Top Contenders for the Best Paint for Stucco Siding
  • The Best Exterior Paint for Wood & Concrete Siding

    • Top Contenders for Wood & Concrete Siding + How they Rank
  • What You Need to Know About Exterior Paint

    • Average Cost (per gallon)
    • Average Life Expectancy of Each Paint
    • Ease of Application for Different Products
    • Thickness of Paint
    • Temperature Requirements for Application
  • Common Exterior Paint FAQ

The Best Exterior Paint for Stucco Siding

In some regions of the country, stucco is a prevalent choice for home exterior siding material.

It’s easy to see why when you take into consideration it’s inherent durability and long life expectancy.

Best House Paint Stucco

Why Does Stucco Require Different Paint?

The nice thing about a stucco home is the longevity of the paint job. You don’t have to paint stucco as frequently as wood sided homes. But when it is time to paint, it’s going to cost more money.

Stucco paint jobs require more paint (and labor time) than a wood sided home. Stucco tends to soak up more paint because of its porous nature. It also requires more paint to cover well because of the texture of stucco. When applying the paint, it usually needs to be “back rolled”.

Back rolling is a technique where the paint is sprayed on and then rolled into the stucco.

We’re looking for a good quality paint that can evenly coat the nooks and crannies found in stucco and seal the gaps of a rough stucco surface.

So we asked our network of contractors to weigh in on what they believe is the best house paint for stucco siding.

Here are the results:

Best House Paint Stucco

An overwhelming amount of contractors and business owners across North America agreed that Sherwin Williams: Loxon™ is the best house paint for exterior stucco.

This is partially due to the Loxon™ line being purpose-engineered to withstand harsh weather conditions, resist mildew, and defend against efflorescence (the deposit of metal-salts carried by moisture).

Must-have properties for painting businesses that guarantee their work!

Many contractors noted the superior color retention properties of Loxon™, and the fact that it was intentionally designed to be used on stucco and masonry-type surfaces.

Traditionally, repainting stucco surfaces called for multiple applications of new paint – beginning with elastomeric acrylic-based paint (for old stucco) OR a water-based masonry sealer (for newer stucco).

Sherwin Williams Loxon™ offers a  more economic solution, being able to sufficiently cover stucco surfaces without the addition of costly base layers.

This saves consumers money on both materials AND labor costs, making it an attractive option when trying to update the exterior appearance of their home.

One additional quality that helps bring the Loxon line in at #1 is the “breathable” coat which prevents moisture buildup that could shorten the lifespan of exterior repaints.

For more technical information on the Sherwin Williams Loxon Line, click here.


Top Contenders for Stucco Siding

During our poll, several brands and paint lines came up as potential candidates for the number 1 spot.

Editor’s note: this article was, in no way, sponsored by any paint provider. The options for the final vote were decided via a preliminary open vote – followed by a closed vote for the top 6

Here’s a quick breakdown of those results:

Best House Paint Stucco


  • Sherwin Williams Loxon – 47.7% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $25.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 8-10 years
      • Ease of Use: Moderate with experience
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 8.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Superpaint – 18.2% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $25.00-$28.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 5-7 years
      • Ease of Use: Easy
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Duration – 18.2% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $44.00-$77.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 8-10 years
      • Ease of Use: Moderate, depending on surface
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Conflex Sherlastic – 11.4% of the final vote
  • Sherwin Williams Emerald – 0% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $50.00-$72.00
      • Average Life Expectancy:6-8 years
      • Ease of Use: Moderate with experience
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 4.0 mils
  • PPG Sunproof – 4.5% of the final vote
    • Product Data Sheet (customer information sheet unavailable)
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $39.00-$52.00
      • Ease of Use: Easy
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0-7.0 mils

Best Exterior paint from contractors


The Best Exterior Paint for Wood & Concrete Siding

Wood and concrete (fiber cement) siding are listed as two of the top five most popular siding options for houses in North America.

Best House Paint Wood siding

Sought after for their pleasing aesthetics, it’s a safe bet that those in the painting industry encounter these materials regularly when setting up estimates for prospective customers.

So what’s the highest voted paint for wood & concrete siding?

Here are the results:

Best House Panit wood siding

Sherwin Williams was the #1 voted best house paint for wood & concrete siding.

It’s popularity stems from the hard coating it forms during the curing process for a long lasting paint job, coat coverage to avoid the need for multiple coats, and ease of application.

The advanced acrylic formulation of Sherwin Williams Duration is known to bond to a given surface with a durable coating that prevents cracking & peeling, while extending the lifetime of the paint job and reducing the cost of future repaints (due to reduced prep time).

Though the cost of Duration paint tends to retail in the mid $70/gallon range, it performs as self-priming. It’s an expensive paint and you get what you pay for… A high quality paint job.

While most paints are advertised as requiring only a single coat, SW Duration delivers on that promise. When compared to other popular brand name paints with “1-coat claims”, contractors stated that Duration was miles ahead of the competition.

Most contractors report the paint as “easy to apply”. It feels far thicker than most paints they have experience with. Drips & runs are minimalized (practically null) – even when applying the paint to the underside of horizontal surfaces.

This can be a real time saver for painting contractors.

When buying paint, look for sales on Sherwin Williams products that can help bring the cost of a gallon of paint down considerably. Many painting contractors have volume discounts and can get much better prices, passing those savings along to customers.

Lower per gallon, the 1-coat promise, and the extended lifetime of a high quality paint goes a long way in delivering a product that is difficult to beat.


Top Contenders for Wood & Concrete Siding + How they Rank

The results for our Wood & Concrete siding paint poll were a bit of a landslide during the closed voting period. The top 5 paints were voted on.

Here’s what was decided:

Best House Paint - Wood Siding


  • Sherwin Williams Duration – 59.3% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $44.00-$77.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 8-10 years
      • Ease of Use: Moderate, depending on surface
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Superpaint (tied for 2nd) – 14.8% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $25.00-$28.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 5-7 years
      • Ease of Use: Easy
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Resilience (tied for 2nd)
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $50.00-$72.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 5-7 years
      • Ease of Use: Easy
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 4.0 mils
  • Sherwin Williams Emerald –  7.4% of the final vote
    • Customer information sheet
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $50.00-$72.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 6-8 years
      • Ease of Use: Moderate with experience
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 4.0 mils
  • PPG Permanizer
    • Product Data Sheet (Customer information sheet unavailable)
      • Average Cost (per gallon): $24.00-$38.00
      • Average Life Expectancy: 9-10 years
      • Ease of Use: Easy
      • Thickness (Wet Film Thickness): 5.0-7.0 mils

Sherwin Williams was the clear winner in all of the contractor polls conducted. Their quality and strong customer service department is what keeps their annual growth steady beyond $10 billion.

Not only do we support these results, we stand behind them. We recommend Sherwin Williams products in all of our residential repaints.

Looking for more information? Scroll down to go through the most frequently asked questions we get about exterior paints!


Common Exterior Paint FAQ

Q) Is Sherwin Williams Paint better than Behr?

Generally, professional painting businesses will recommend Sherwin Williams for residential repaints. Behr paint tends to be lower priced, and for the budget-minded DIY’er, it should suffice for most jobs. However, when comparing top of the line paints from each manufacturer, contractors agree that Sherwin Williams is the best all around.

Q) What paint (type) should I use on a house exterior?

Majority of professional painting businesses will recommend acrylic (latex) paint rather than oil based. Modern acrylic paints provide a better finish & longer lasting paint job unless the surface (to be painted) mandates an oil-based paint (e.g. distressed or aged material). Latex paints tend to have better adhesion, increased ease of application, as well as a longer life expectancy when compared to oil based paints.

Q) What is paint made of? (We asked a chemist)

For this answer, we’re going to focus on acrylic paint – which is the most commonly used type of paint for home exteriors.

Acrylic paint can be categorized into several components:

  • Pigment – Pigment can exist in both organic (tending towards darker hues) & inorganic forms (tending towards brighter hues). The majority of organic pigments sold commercially, today, are produced via synthetic chemical reactions from petrochemical refineries (crude oil cracking). Inorganic pigments are generally synthesized via oxidative reactions of metals (e.g. TiO2(s))
  • Binder – Also referred to as resins – binders in emulsion paints are composed of homo- or copolymers of vinyl acetate and an acrylic ester.  Binders work to adhere pigment particles to a surface or substrate & act in conjunction with the solvent as a “vehicle” for pigment transport or mobility. Without a “vehicle”, pigment particles are solid compounds without adhesive properties. When introduced into an emulsion solution, applied, and allowed to precipitate out of solution during a ‘curing’ period, they exhibit the desired effect of an evenly applied coat of paint. Furthermore, the “hard” surface that occurs arises during paint curing is due to a compound known as Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). PMMA is hydrophobic, meaning it hates being in contact with water. The copolymerization of vinyl acetate facilitates an environment in which PMMA doesn’t interact (directly) with water in a paint solvent. Instead, it interacts with the hydrophobic cores of the polyvinyl acetate copolymers, allowing it to remain suspended in an, otherwise, unhospitable environment.
  • Solvent – Solvents (either water or volatile organic compounds) act as a diluting agent that reduces the viscosity of the binder/pigment emulsion system. Without a solvent, even the binder/pigment emulsion system would be too viscous to allow for even application of paint to a substrate.
  • Additives – Depending on the desired effect, various additives can be included in paint formulation.
    • Silicone additives improve weather resistance, .
    • Dispersants separate and stabilize (energetically) pigment particles
    • Driers accelerate drying time
    • Anti-settling agents prevent particles from “falling out” of emulsion systems
    • Bactericides preserve water based paints in the can

Q) Does exterior paint need primer?

No. Primer should be used on local failures where the previous paint has peeled and the wood is exposed. Those areas require proper preparation.

See our article on prepping an exterior properly

Q) Do paint jobs really come with lifetime warranties and guarantees?

Yes and no. The lifetime warranties and guarantees are manufacturer warranties that cover chemical failures.

If a chemical failure occurs, the manufacturer will pay for the cost of the materials (paint) used. However, labor is NOT covered by a manufacturer’s warranty.

Click here to shop painting contractors and get competitive bids near you.

Q) What is “sheen” and what’s best for exterior?

Sheen is the gloss or finish of the paint.

  • Higher gloss shows more imperfections.
  • A flat finish isn’t glossy enough to look like a new coat of paint, and it’s hard to clean.
  • Satin is the preferred choice for the “body” of the house and sometimes the trim.
  • Semi gloss is another popular choice for trim, and is also recommended for the front door.

Q) What temperature (outdoor) should it be when I paint my house?

Depending on the paint type (oil or acrylic), you’ll need to apply paint to your home’s exterior while the temperature stays between 40°-90°F (oil) or 50°-85°F (acrylic). Curing paint is a chemical reaction with temperature dependent rates. Too low, and the chemical reaction won’t occur. Too high, and side reactions may occur – creating undesired products – consequently weakening the paint.

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